Paint Basket Member Art Forum

Author Topic: Do you varnish your watercolor paintings?  (Read 915 times)

SignLadyJ

  • Color Wheel
  • *
  • Posts: 67
    • Jestek Custom Graphics
on: December 02, 2016, 05:50:35 PM
Do you varnish your watercolor paintings?
If so what process and materials do you use?
Any tips to do this?

Thanks,
Jeannie
Where ever you go....there you are.


Annie.

  • Canvas
  • *
  • Posts: 2587
  • "Stop talking, just do it!" Anonymous
Reply #1 on: December 03, 2016, 06:10:05 AM
Nolan shows how to use a can to spray a light coating on pencil drawing in one of the last few lessons of the Let's Draw Course.  He is quick to say he doesn't do this on his own drawings. 

I cannot recall if there is/are comment about watercolour.  But the spray  can I have says that it can be used on pencil, WC, and pastel drawings.

I simply slip mine in a polypropylene acid free transparent cover in a portfolio binder, or frame under glass for display.

But wait to see what experience members say.  Good question!
Cheers, Annie
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”    ― Plato


Danielle123

  • Master Artist
  • *
  • Posts: 6466
Reply #2 on: December 03, 2016, 10:15:11 AM
Never heard of varnishing a watercolour, what has to be done to preserve it is to put an acid free mat ,,a glass frame and a backing paper to prevent dust and all.
Danielle
Pourquoi remettre à plus tard ce qu'on peut faire aujourd'hui?
Why put off until tomorrow  what you can do today.


SignLadyJ

  • Color Wheel
  • *
  • Posts: 67
    • Jestek Custom Graphics
Reply #3 on: December 03, 2016, 11:48:38 AM
I am seeing that some folks do not want glass over their watercolor paintings are doing this.

I also have gotten some watercolor powders that have no archival quality at all. If a painting is made with them, it will need to have some sort of protection, or any dampness will reactivate color and change the painting.

I would not use this method for every watercolor painting, but I have a couple things in mind. One is greeting cards that protection may be a necessary evil to protect the painting. I think of people like my son who has very sweaty hands.

Jeannie

PS: I found this post on the web that has makes some points on this process. http://www.goldenpaints.com/blog/2007/plastic-arts/varnishing-watercolors/
« Last Edit: December 03, 2016, 05:32:07 PM by SignLadyJ »
Where ever you go....there you are.


Val

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Artist
  • *****
  • Posts: 19488
  • SMILE, It's a brand new day!
Reply #4 on: December 03, 2016, 03:23:41 PM
Be aware that like drawings, varnish can cause the paper to discolour thereby also affecting the overall colours of the painting.

I would suggest putting the painting in an acid free acetate envelope to keep the painting/card clean. Another option would be to have the painting reproduced on a more preferable platform.
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


dennis

  • Administrator
  • Master Artist
  • *
  • Posts: 7107
Reply #5 on: December 03, 2016, 06:13:28 PM
I occasionally waterproof my watercolor paintings when I know they will not be handled with care, or needs some additional protection against raindrops and accidental spillage (eg, at a framer - some are not so careful). I have successfully test a spray called KRYLON Matte Finish 1311. Made by Krylon Products Group, Cleveland Ohio. Just beware that it is extremely inflammable. It is also non-yellowing, which is a great plus,

Just be careful with the other Fixative sprays as they only meant to settle any loose dust from the pencil and pastel, etc. They are for dry mediums only and NOT intend for waterproofing.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


SignLadyJ

  • Color Wheel
  • *
  • Posts: 67
    • Jestek Custom Graphics
Reply #6 on: December 04, 2016, 08:17:40 AM
Thanks Dennis for the tip. I will give it a try.
I might even have some in my stock room. How many coats do you typically apply?

I was not sure about why folks do the next step of a brush on varnish?
In my mind something like Krylon should give sufficient protection.

Jeannie
Where ever you go....there you are.


dennis

  • Administrator
  • Master Artist
  • *
  • Posts: 7107
Reply #7 on: December 04, 2016, 10:55:10 AM
Jeannie, One or two light sprays will suffice for normal circumstances. O lot depends on what you expect to happen to the painting. My spray can is for emergencies only. The best is to make a few test strips and then test the spray to your satisfaction. Just remember that the more you spray the glossier the painting will become.

I gave mine two reasonable sprays (drying in between) and them when completely dry, actually went over with a very wet brush without any damage at all.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Kathysutterlin

  • Easel
  • *
  • Posts: 1944
  • Each day is a gift! Live it fully.
Reply #8 on: December 04, 2016, 11:50:43 AM
 Have any of you used the Krylon Workable Fixatif 1306? I have a can of it but haven't tried it yet. The label says it protects pencil, pastel, and chalk.
Kathy S.


Steve Weatherwax

  • Easel
  • *
  • Posts: 1227
Reply #9 on: December 08, 2016, 05:44:14 AM
Why not take a look at Krylon's UV Archival Finish. It says it protects on watercolors. You can't go wrong with Krylon products. They're pretty high quality. I've used their fine art finish 1374, which is a workable fixative for graphite, charcoal and other dry mediums. Just spray it outdoors.
Steve W


 

SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal