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Author Topic: Selling Your Art Course  (Read 1853 times)

Kathysutterlin

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Reply #15 on: November 30, 2016, 10:18:29 AM
 :thankyou: Annie
 :thankyou: Mea

I agree with both of you. I really like my signature of my first name only. It feels right and it feels personally mine. I think I'll stay with it.  :hug:
Kathy S.


JayJ

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Reply #16 on: December 12, 2016, 04:08:39 AM
I like the signature too!
I love the painting!!!😊
Zayn


nolan

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Reply #17 on: December 15, 2016, 02:08:59 AM
you can sign just Kathy if you want, but I suggest you add something to it to make it more unique. I just sign Nolan, but the way it is written is not normal script so I know that another Nolan will not inadvertently sign in the same manner.

SO although your signature is pretty (I do like it), it is too close to normal script so another Kathy could easily have a very similar handwriting / signature to yours.

Remember your signature is one of the 3 elements so it MUST stand out and be memorable O0


Annie.

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Reply #18 on: December 15, 2016, 06:05:44 AM
So Nolan, you would say the same thing of mine?
Cheers, Annie
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”    ― Plato


Kathysutterlin

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Reply #19 on: December 15, 2016, 09:48:48 AM
you can sign just Kathy if you want, but I suggest you add something to it to make it more unique. I just sign Nolan, but the way it is written is not normal script so I know that another Nolan will not inadvertently sign in the same manner.

SO although your signature is pretty (I do like it), it is too close to normal script so another Kathy could easily have a very similar handwriting / signature to yours.

Remember your signature is one of the 3 elements so it MUST stand out and be memorable O0

Yes, I do see what you are saying, Nolan. I will continue to work on it. Thanks!  ;)
Kathy S.


Win

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Reply #20 on: December 15, 2016, 11:16:07 AM
I have such an awkward name and surname to try create a unique signature  :heeha:, I have tried so many different ways, in the end I have decided to go with the one on my latest meerkat drawing ,  :confused:
Win


Kathysutterlin

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Reply #21 on: December 15, 2016, 11:34:17 AM
I have such an awkward name and surname to try create a unique signature  :heeha:, I have tried so many different ways, in the end I have decided to go with the one on my latest meerkat drawing ,  :confused:

Win, I just went back to your Meerkat ,which I still love, to look at your signature. I like it. It is unique.
Kathy S.


Kathysutterlin

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Reply #22 on: December 16, 2016, 07:29:00 PM
Nolan, I would like to stay with my first name if I can create a unique signature. I want something that feels natural and comfortable to write. These two examples are taking my first initial and then writing the rest of my name on a diagonal down the "K". Would something like this make it memorable and unique?
Kathy S.


mea hamo pena

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Reply #23 on: December 16, 2016, 10:05:29 PM
They both look nice, Kathy.

aloha

mea
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artistforsaleorrent

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Reply #24 on: December 17, 2016, 05:14:58 AM
Kathy,
just tried sending a message but it probably didn't go through so I'll try this way. After spending almost 3 years conserving and documenting 1000 plus paintings of all media for a private collector some years ago, I found one important aspect for an artist. The full name. In order to price a painting for resale, especially those from the 19th century and very early 20th, "PROVENANCE" must be ascertained. It has to be beyond a shadow of a doubt that the brush strokes, the signature, the medium MUST be identifiable as being from a specific human, or in this case - an artist.

I went nuts trying to find three artists who only signed their first name and a date (one specific water colorist from 1887)... spent over a year on sights like "Ask Art" and failed in all three cases. Can you imagine how hard it would be for a conservator to prove that a painting signed simply "Norman" came from the hand of someone who's last name happened to be "Rockwell"? Even simple initials make the task daunting.

Now I'm not saying that you'll be the next "Rockwell" although your work has improved tremendously since I came aboard and viewed your progress... but consider this: 100 years from now, someone wants to verify that the painting their grandmother bought from a gallery with the signature "Kathy" actually came from your hands and that "PROVENANCE" has to be established before a resale can be made (and if not, it will then go for pennies on the dollar).

Just something to think about... Use your full name! It'll save museums and art collectors a whole lot of time and effort to know that you and not Kathy Ireland or Kathy Anybodyelse painted the fine piece of art they want to display.

Robert
Never be afraid to fail, because after all, "fail" actually stands for "the first attempt in learning". Robert


Kathysutterlin

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Reply #25 on: December 17, 2016, 08:08:04 AM
 :thankyou: Thank you, Robert. I always appreciate hearing from you. I did get your message and responded to it but I'm glad you posted here too. I think this is a great discussion for the forum. You have brought up important facts to consider.

I had been signing with both first and last name for a while. I was not happy with how my signature looked. It seemed to intrude on my artwork.  I share the concern that "Kathy" is not enough. I will go back and play with my signature using first and last name and sign a bit smaller.  ;)


Kathy S.


Win

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Reply #26 on: December 18, 2016, 10:07:56 AM
Thats an interesting point you have made Robert, I have always used my initial of my first name and  my full surname, then Nolan said we must try and make our signature unique,  :heeha: I have tried every which way to use my full name and surname  "not using block letters " but its impossible. So I modified my original signature.... Looks like I may have to go back to the drawing board.  Going to be a problem to ascertain "provenance" for my art in 100 years with differing signatures  ;D :whistle:
Win


artistforsaleorrent

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Reply #27 on: December 19, 2016, 04:48:03 AM
Actually, it's not as hard as you might think as long as the full name is used. Case in point... look at early Norman Rockwell paintings and Saturday Evening Post covers... he used to use sort of a cursive signature then many years later went with the more familiar one.

If a conservator knows the artist's full name, there are many "art research sites" (Ask Art is only one which also provides information on purchasing antiquities as well as biographical material) ... and it's not as difficult as you might think, now with the internet... Think of how much easier it'll be in 10 -20 years, much less 100. And if you paint specifically with oils, they're pretty much guaranteed to last up to 200 years without cracking if they were stretched and varnished correctly.

Acrylics, on the other hand, haven't been available for more than my own lifetime, I seem to remember trying them in my 20's and fell in love with them for certain projects, so there's no real reference to how long an acrylic will hold it's color over a great span of time. However, since it is vinyl based, chances are that the colors will hold for quite a span of years, as plastic tends to degrade much slower than organics like oil and water colors. Also, the later two can be ruined by an over application of water, whereas, acrylics seem to be unaffected by water once dry.

So if nothing else, if you prepare and seal any painting on canvas correctly (or as best you can)... it'll take the canvas itself many, many years to "rot" away and future generations will be able to view and enjoy your creations. As for water colors, I suggest what is called "Conservation or Museum quality mounting and framing"... expensive, yes, needing a very skilled framer, yes........ but believe me, trying to revitalize and conserve a water color which has been stained by "windex"  is extremely difficult and very expensive.... (always, and I do mean always.... take down and lay flat a water color before cleaning the glass and allow it to dry before putting it back on the wall, as those who just clean their framed water color on the wall will find that gravity tends to puddle any liquid on the base and it leaks inside whereby it is absorbed by the mat and the art, as easily as a cotton ball absorbs humidity.... causing discoloration and staining).....

Good luck folks... oh and if interested my web site is http://www.yourbasicwebpage.com/art. Always glad to help!
Robert
Never be afraid to fail, because after all, "fail" actually stands for "the first attempt in learning". Robert


Annie.

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Reply #28 on: December 19, 2016, 07:49:52 AM
Point well taken Robert, but isn't it why one should write their full name, title of the painting, and year completed on the back of the canvas?   Then one would only worry about having a unique but simple and easy to remember signature on the front. 

The gestalt image is what I would recall when I see Kathy's signature, more then the word Kathy. 

On that note Kathy, I like the slented idea... but what would you think of slenting it up instead of down?  Especially if in the right lower corner,  it will pull the eye out of the painting (does anyone sign on the top left corner???  that would be unique, maybe for some ultra modern art! 😨 ).  Anyway,  the other thing is that we inconsciously associated up with optimism and down with pessimism.

Food for more thoughts if you haven't settled yet.  But I agree you must find a signature that you first really love and that you feel comfortable that it is 'you'.

Good luck!
Cheers, Annie
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”    ― Plato


artistforsaleorrent

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Reply #29 on: December 19, 2016, 08:35:05 AM
Annie,

I have to say that I disagree with you for two stark reasons, one physical and one professional.

Having seen the backs of quite a few very very old paintings, one is struck with the fact that the inside/back of a canvas that has hung in a museum for years, that material once white and untreated obviously, tends to turn from amber to dark brown to almost a burnt umber in 75 years. If it was hung in the living room of a tobacco user, or above a fireplace (which is much more common) the untreated canvas will be so dark as to make reading a signature (usually done with ink - the old kind, not the pernament ink ones we have today) impossible. And you'd be surprised how many 19th century artists that I viewed did that! Even with a strong solution of soap and water, add to that the very real chance of washing away the signature ... cleaning untreated canvas is at best a serious decision for a conservator because any water or God forbid turpentine to get rid of the tobacco staining will loosen the threads of the canvas and may weaken the actual adherence of the pigment/painting. Also, if one thought about varnishing their signature to preserve it, realize that a painting has to breathe and if the pigment can't breathe (expand/contract with temperature and humidity changes) the front pigment/painting will be unable to stretch or condense and will crack and peel much earlier that it should.

The second reason I disagree is professional. If I put forth a piece of art, I want every viewer to know exactly where it came from, or perhaps a bit of shameless self promotion, I want them to know I did it, and not someone else. You have no idea how many viewers ask me if I'm related to Robert Henri, even though I spell my surname Henry. They know his name and history, so why shouldn't someday, people either conservators or buyers know the name Kathy Sutterlin and be able to identify her technique as being unique?

So many of you here are on the road to artistic successes. The must be traditional reasons somehow to explain why artists throughout time signed their paintings in front for the world to see, in just the same way that Michaelangelo actually went into the chapel where his Pietá had been installed and during the night, carved his full name on the base. Certainly not for pride or conceit, but rather to make sure that everyone knew "MICHAELANGLUS BONAROVUS FLORENT FACEBAT" (translation- Michaelangelo Buonarroti of Florence made this). Can you imagine history never being able to actually know who, at the age of 24, created the single most absolutely beautiful sculpture the world has ever seen? Sure, none of us will be a Michaelangelo or a Norman Rockwell or even but why leave it to chance? If you don't want folks to know who you are, incorporate and use a Nom du Plume (or probably a Nom du Arte). Point is... put your signature proudly on the front as part and parcel of your art. But this is my opinion folks.
Robert
Never be afraid to fail, because after all, "fail" actually stands for "the first attempt in learning". Robert


 

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