Paint Basket Member Art Forum

Author Topic: Cast Shadows in a Painting  (Read 698 times)

njnjgirl

  • Experienced Artist
  • *
  • Posts: 4289
on: September 12, 2016, 02:31:27 PM
When adding shadows in a painting, I know the cast shadows would be quite strong if the sun were shining brightly.   So, my question is, do we paint with the assumption that there is bright sunshine all the time? 

Or can we paint lighter cast shadows as if the day was a bit more cloudy.  Would it be okay sometimes  to have subtle shadows rather than strong shadows?  How does one know?

Also, for a shadow color, I use a purply mix, is that correct, or would it depend on the shadow?

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts..Thank you!
Mary Lou

Faith is the opposite of fear.


Steve Weatherwax

  • Easel
  • *
  • Posts: 1226
Reply #1 on: September 12, 2016, 05:18:09 PM
It depends. If your picture doesn't give a clue as to the weather conditions, then it really depends on the mood you're trying to convey. If you're trying to tell the viewer that it is a cloudy day, then softer cast shadows are in order. If your painting has cloudy skies, then your shadows would be softer. Also, shadows are affected by the shape of the object casting it. A building has sharper edges, so the shadow would be sharper. Conversely, a tree would cast softer edges.

You can create shadow colors by taking the color(s) of the object and dulling it by adding it's commentary color. Add red to green to get the shadow for a tree.

Hope this helps a bit. :)

P.S. The number of light sources will affect the cast shadow. If you were painting a subject lit by multiple light sources, you'd have one or multiple diffused shadows determined by the subjects position in relation to the lights
« Last Edit: September 12, 2016, 05:33:00 PM by Steve Weatherwax »
Steve W


njnjgirl

  • Experienced Artist
  • *
  • Posts: 4289
Reply #2 on: September 13, 2016, 03:06:11 AM
Thanks Steve,  I pretty much thought the same thing.  Just wanted to know if it was okay in a painting to have cast shadows that were not dark.   Seems that is a criticism in some of my work, that the shadow needs to be darkened.  Yet, I think sometimes, the dark shadow is a distraction, but just wanted to know what others thought .  I think I am having a hard time expressing my question.  '
Mary Lou

Faith is the opposite of fear.


Steve Weatherwax

  • Easel
  • *
  • Posts: 1226
Reply #3 on: September 13, 2016, 06:41:23 AM
You're welcome. Go to the internet and so a search on drawing shadows. There's much more info than I can go through here. Another thing to remember is that shadows cast by less intense light will tend to be darker the closer it is to the object casting it. It will lighten the further is it cast from the source. :)
Steve W


njnjgirl

  • Experienced Artist
  • *
  • Posts: 4289
Reply #4 on: September 13, 2016, 12:05:33 PM
Thanks Steve, I appreciate the help. :thankyou:
Mary Lou

Faith is the opposite of fear.


 

SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal