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Other => Hints and Tips => Topic started by: nolan on November 11, 2010, 12:12:01 AM

Title: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: nolan on November 11, 2010, 12:12:01 AM
Art Lessons - How to paint shiny, metal or reflective objects (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEsya8pD72s#ws)

The secret to painting metal, shiny or reflective objects is in the highlights.

The shinier the object, the brighter and more "in focus" the highlight becomes.
So a dull object will have no discernible highlight, rather a broad area of mid tone that fades away to the shadow colour.
A slightly shiny or reflective surface, eg. a dull metal like lead, will show a slightly noticeable highlight spot and the entire highlight area will seem to have shrunk.
The more polished or reflective the area becomes, the smaller and the more in focus and brighter the highlight becomes until we reach a mirror like surface where the highlight will be at it's brightest and be so focused that you can see the actual light source.

So to summarize : if you want to paint a dull surface broaden and darken your highlight area.
If you want a polished and reflective surface increase the amount of detail and contrast on the highlight area.
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Val on November 11, 2010, 03:03:22 AM
Hi Nolan...Read the article but couldn't get the video to play.  :confused:  Will definately have to reread that one a couple of times to get it to sink in.  ???
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: nolan on November 11, 2010, 03:47:34 AM
the video is also on our youtube channel and on our facebook page
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Kelley on November 11, 2010, 07:19:40 AM
 :clap: This is a very valuable and helpful video.  I like how you showed the gradient differences from nonmetalic, nonreflective to completely reflective and explained the highlights.  Thank you much Nolan!
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: nolan on November 11, 2010, 01:09:13 PM
I was actually busy filming our pencil drawing course and showing something else when it struck me that I could show the concept perfectly using my Xmas decorations  ;D
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Val on November 17, 2010, 05:06:31 AM
Pencil drawing course? Will that be part of this course or separate? I'm for anything that will give me a leg up!  ::) (N. Americans always take that the wrong way!)  :offtopic:  Right, I've watched the video a few more times and I'm going to try doing the 4 balls in a row to show the differences. This should be a bit of a challenge for me....are you up for it Kelley? :)
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Kelley on November 17, 2010, 08:55:51 AM
I don't have the right type of pencils, but let's do this :deal:.  And I know what you meant.. to be ahead of the game or have the step up advantage, or leg up a rung of the ladder, no?  ;)
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: nolan on November 17, 2010, 11:29:37 AM
:clap: new artworks coming up :clap:

The pencil drawing course is our two day seminar which we have been conducting for donkeys years already and have now decided to convert it to an online course / DVD. Folks that have never drawn before walk out amazed at their drawings. I am expanding it a bit to include some new bonus material a well. I have spent the last week solid doing animations and voice overs for the course. O0
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Val on November 17, 2010, 04:52:05 PM
Hey Kelley... I did the last sphere with a 2H and a 4B....other than regular pencils they are all I have at the moment. Amazing the gradient shading you can get even with a normal pencil. Great, we'll give it a go!  :deal:  :clap:
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Val on November 17, 2010, 04:54:23 PM
The course sounds terrific Nolan...let me know when it is available. I'll have to get to a duty free island! Not out of the question.  :)
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: nolan on November 17, 2010, 09:32:29 PM
The course sounds terrific Nolan...let me know when it is available.

will do O0

I'll have to get to a duty free island!

clever  :smart:

Amazing the gradient shading you can get even with a normal pencil.

I have also sometimes managed to do most of the drawing with an HB
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Kelley on November 17, 2010, 10:40:56 PM
This isn't as easy as it looks :sweat: , but is a great experience. Picture 1 and 2 are reversed in order of sequence of how Nolan presented them in the video (hope you can tell.)   I am not very fond of the very shiny, reflective metal looking one because the shadowing or highlight was off or something.  Perhaps because I moved the reflected ball and the figure's arm and the door isn't dark.  I am not sure exactly.  I think the third globe is my favourite.  By the way Nolan, thanks for supplying the modeling.  Okay Val, your turn.
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Kelley on November 17, 2010, 10:44:46 PM
Here is one last shot of the four Christmas ornaments together. 
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: dennis on November 17, 2010, 11:11:33 PM
Nolan, we will have to watch it. These guys are going to outdo us if we don't move it  :whistle:
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: nolan on November 17, 2010, 11:18:44 PM
I was thinking the same thing :heeha: , superb job Kelley  :yippee: :clap:

I agree that #3 is my favourite too O0

Only place I can find where you could improve is to darken the shadow on the last reflective one, on the top left hand side
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: nolan on November 17, 2010, 11:20:40 PM
you really must add these to your gallery Kelley
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Kelley on November 17, 2010, 11:29:32 PM
Dennis and Nolan, :not_worthy: I could never outdo you gentlemen, but I really appreciate the generous comments.   I'll darken the last globe as you suggested Nolan.  Thank you!  This has been valuable because I have been wanting to paint some metallic looking surfaces, but wasn't sure how to portray them such as chrome bumpers on automobiles or spoons.  I suspect it is a combination of lighting and what is being reflected back.

Wow, I love this place!  :hug: (Finally found an excuse to use that group hug smiley)
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Val on November 18, 2010, 04:28:34 AM
 :surrender: Kelley, they are awesome!  :clap: I can't seem to get anywhere with the 'all' shiny one. I'll study yours a bit and have another go. Well done!  :clap:
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Kelley on November 18, 2010, 07:37:41 AM
Thank you Val.  I wasn't expecting such accolades over Christmas globes.  The most reflective globe was the most difficult I think because it has mirror effect and you have to consider what it is reflecting back and how the lighting is hitting it and where the light is reflecting off of it (causing more light) as well.  My camera isn't showing the lighting on the drawings the way my eye is so it looks different "in person" than it does in pictures a little.  I'll have to play with the settings a bit.  Anyway, I added one more shot here with the left side of the globe darkened some.
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Val on November 18, 2010, 09:21:18 AM
Wow!...Just keeps getting betterer and better!!  :2funny: I'll get back to the globes, just finished (sort of) my painting of a laughing gull. My bet is he was laughing at me!  :2funny: Still have a couple of problem areas to work on but starting to see how the w/c paints work....they're tricky!  :sneaky:
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: nolan on November 18, 2010, 01:25:05 PM
great job Kelley, the changes make a big difference.

Here is my version of the dull ball

Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Kelley on November 18, 2010, 06:30:51 PM
 :heeha: Wooweee!  :clap: Very precise and smooth.  I can see where the reflected light on the bottom right is distinct.  I placed a dark line to differentiate "space" and the object, but I see that it wasn't necessary .. or at least shouldn't have been as dark because the darkened area did that for you.  I added three shadows indicating three separate light sources, but it wasn't necessary for the effect and really didn't do much for the drawing. I need to pay closer attention to your lessons. :whistle: of removing things that aren't necessary.  Great job Nolan. 
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: nolan on November 19, 2010, 01:49:33 AM
actually it was very observant of you to realise that there were in fact 3 light sources as multiple light sources can really mess around with what you "expect" to see sometimes. :clap:
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Val on November 19, 2010, 03:39:10 AM
 :surrender: wow...and all I wanted to do was draw some balls!!  :2funny: All very helpful information, but I think I may be bordering on overload. :D You guys amaze me!!  :clap: I'm not giving up...just starting over! I promise to post the next batch.
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Kelley on November 19, 2010, 07:52:50 AM
I hope this didn't discourage you Val, but rather encouraged you more.  You are remarkable with the pencil and brush and hope that you aspire to improve not because this is competition but because you are driven by inspiration and coaching.  Hope this makes sense. :-\   You are amazing and I just want to make sure you don't get discouraged or overwhelmed by other people's work.  For example, I could never do as well as Dennis or Nolan, but I am going to keep trying.  That is why their lessons are so valuable to me - they are so willing to teach.  My apologies if I'm babbling or out of place.  Just hope you know I always look forward to seeing your work.
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: dennis on November 19, 2010, 10:11:21 AM
Kelley, I just want to reword what you just said. In the Bible there is a piece that says, and I paraphrase:
 " student is not above the teacher but the student can be as good as the teacher"

What it means is that the teacher can only teach you what he/she actually knows. Lots of people teach but only have limited knowledge - so the student can only learn up to that level while with that particular teacher. If that student leaves and goes to a teacher that is of a higher level then - guess what? - that student will learn up that teacher's level  ....... and so on. Get the drift?

You CAN eventually be as good as us - there is absolutely nothing stopping you from getting there. Another thing - there ARE others better than us.  :clap: :clap: and we still learn from them  :clap: :clap: Why? To be able to teach YOU, and others, better.   That what's life in the Arts is all  about.

In a few weeks time I'll be attending a 3-day workshop in Auckland by the world reknown Australian watercolourist  Joseph Zbukvic.

Do you see how this fits is what I have just been telling you. there are artists better than us.

To all other artists reading this: ALWAYS aspire to be the best you can be. When you start becoming comfortable - shift the goal posts - and keep on doing this. Everyone has the potential to be a Master in his/her field of the Arts. The answer is to find the best teacher and then persevere - there is not such thing a a free meal  :heeha:

Kelley, here are the words you said that will bring you, and anyone else, success:
"....but I am going to keep trying."

Go for it!
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Val on November 19, 2010, 11:55:34 AM
Hello All...Just popped in for a break. Wow, lots going on. First please let me set the record straight, I don't feel intimidated, or discouraged by all of your works...rather inspired, and yes probably driven to improve and achieve a higher level.   :clap: I am just amazed when I look at artworks knowing that it was nothing more than a blank canvas or paper, and seeing what has been created by someone's hand. My only hope is perhaps not greatness...but having the ability to create something of equal quality...and with the help of people and friends like you lot...I think I stand a fighting chance! But be forewarned...is going to be one heck of a bumpy ride, so be prepared to push when necessary  :knuppel2: and I hope we'll all have one jolly good time in the process!  :2funny:  :clap:  :hug:  :clap:  ::)
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: nolan on November 19, 2010, 01:01:19 PM
:clap:
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Kelley on November 19, 2010, 01:22:18 PM
 8) You are so cool Nolan.  Glad you paraphrased Scripture to back up what I was attempting to say.  So amen to that.

Val, :knuppel2: Where are those globes?  ;)
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: dennis on November 19, 2010, 01:38:13 PM
Kelley, that was for artists in general, including ourselves.
There a a lot of people that are not actually on the forum but hover in the background - I do that with other forums as well :whistle: Just take a look at the amount of views to the number actually on the forum. They are also there looking for information to help them in their quest for excellence. I don't mind that at all.

My ultimate goal is to help struggling artists gain experience and confidence in their work to such an extent that they become the accomplished artist they never thought they would ever be.

Here is something I received in an email this morning - backs up what I have been saying.

In Montana, where I'm from, there's this saying:
"The time you want the map ... is before you enter the woods."
The lesson is basic:
Before you embark on any journey, know in advance how to get where you want to go.
Otherwise, you start doing something and then end up all lost and confused.

Have a good day and  ....... Happy Painting!
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: nolan on November 19, 2010, 09:20:09 PM
Here is my version of the reflective ball

Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Kelley on November 19, 2010, 10:16:45 PM
I think my paper is grainier than yours ::).  I see a big difference in your globes and like what you've done in the shadowing & shading.  :clap: :clap:  Very nice, Nolan.
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: nolan on November 20, 2010, 03:41:21 AM
thank you Kelley. I am using regular 80gsm bond photocopy paper
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: Kelley on November 20, 2010, 08:20:06 AM
I really am learning and enjoying seeing the differences or improvements of your work compared to the work I've done.  :clap: Keep at it Nolan.  The paper I used was 70 pts heavyweight, acid free. It says it is meant for sketches in pencil, pen, marker, pastel and charcoal but it seems a bit porous or grainier than copier paper.  I have to "push" the lead into the paper in some instances to fill the pours.  Perhaps I was using the wrong pencil, too.  The next drawing I do will be with an HB and others you and Val listed.
Title: Re: How to paint metal, shiny or reflective objects
Post by: nolan on November 20, 2010, 02:55:52 PM
Kelley, don't worry too much if your paper has a rougher tooth, it just means you will get a more "loose" look to your drawings which is great and gives it more character.