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Watercolour Painting => Watercolour Colour Mixing Questions => Topic started by: Annie. on November 18, 2016, 07:13:57 AM

Title: masking fluid
Post by: Annie. on November 18, 2016, 07:13:57 AM
Masking fluid is used to preserve the white on the paper.

Could it safely be applied to an area with dry paint to preserve a colour?  Presumably a pale colour.

Thank you.
Title: Re: masking fluid
Post by: mea hamo pena on November 18, 2016, 10:15:22 AM
Annie,

I just tried painted a swatch of yellow watercolor.  Let it dry, then applied Winsor & Newton watercolor masking fluid.  Let it dry, hen I went to remove it, it picked up enough of the yellow to lighten a bit.

May try it again with other colors when I have more time.

aloha

mea
Title: Re: masking fluid
Post by: Annie. on November 18, 2016, 12:39:00 PM
Thank you Mea. I did a few little tests which appear ok with light colour but was concerned this may not be a good practice.

Since you also did a test, it means you don't do that when you paint.

Wonder what others will say...
Title: Re: masking fluid
Post by: mea hamo pena on November 18, 2016, 06:04:37 PM
Annie,

I have used masking fluid only for preserving whites.  When I saw some of my test color come on on the masking fluid when I removed it, I decided it was not worth trying to use it to protect colors.

aloha

mea
Title: Re: masking fluid
Post by: Straynative on November 18, 2016, 09:03:51 PM
Hi Annie,

I have done this without an issue. In fact one can use it to great effect in a painting. Just make sure the under painting is completely dry before application and also completely dry before you remove it. I suppose some masking fluids are stronger than others and that could cause issues but as I said I haven't had issues.

Hope this helps
Title: Re: masking fluid
Post by: mea hamo pena on November 18, 2016, 09:13:16 PM
Annie,

Trev is far more experienced than I am.  Based on his testimony, I will give it more tries before I give up on masking fluid for preserving colors other than white space.

Thanks, Trev.

aloha
mea
Title: Re: masking fluid
Post by: Straynative on November 18, 2016, 09:43:06 PM
You can have a lot of fun with it by doing your sketch, masking a few areas for your lightest lights and then doing a light wash. Then mask some other areas and do a slightly darker wash. Mask other areas and go darker with your wash. Keep doing this until you've gotten to your darkest darks. When all dry remove all the making fluid and reveal a nice surprise! :) hope what I said just made sense. (You must make sure your paper and masking fluid is completely dry between each application). :)
Title: Re: masking fluid
Post by: dennis on November 18, 2016, 09:44:49 PM
No problem doing this. When you remove the masking fluid don't rub over with an eraser. The scrubbing action will lift off some paint. Use Masking tape like you see me do it. Pull gently flat across the paper. O0
Title: Re: masking fluid
Post by: Annie. on November 21, 2016, 02:49:50 AM
Thank you very much Trev and Dennis.  :thankyou:

I understand what you are saying Trev... I could make a fun abstract trying the technique.  And I got it 'must be well dry' and gentle on the paper 👍
Title: Re: masking fluid
Post by: John Box on December 19, 2016, 05:11:44 PM
Annie, Winsor & Newton makes both an Art Masking Fluid (left) and Permanent Masking Medium (right). The Masking fluid is more widely used of the two. The Masking Medium is a product that can be mixed with a color or applied over a painted color which forms a resist. I seldom use the stuff as it has been hit and miss for me. The Masking Fluid will leave where applied white as is your paper, but also a hard edge. Here is a vid on using the Permanent Masking Medium.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ci4xVCJQygM (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ci4xVCJQygM)

Title: Re: masking fluid
Post by: Annie. on December 20, 2016, 06:15:52 AM
Thank you John.
I have, and used, the masking fluid.  Dennis provided very clear instructions on its basic use to protect white areas in early classes.

I watch the video on masking medium with interest.  Always fun to hear about more advanced technique which may be use in the future.  I noticed that the red bleed a bit in his yellow on the demo, probably what you hitted by touch and go in your experience.

If I understood Dennis well, when you have a dry edge, you can put water at a little distance from that edge and move it slowly toward the edge. Then by 'rubbing gentle' the bruch on the painted edge you can soften it.  I leaned this very recently, so it would be in the magnolia or one class before, in the recommended order.

Again thank you, most appreciated.
Title: Re: masking fluid
Post by: John Box on December 20, 2016, 07:46:24 AM
Thank you John.
I have, and used, the masking fluid.  Dennis provided very clear instructions on its basic use to protect white areas in early classes.

I watch the video on masking medium with interest.  Always fun to hear about more advanced technique which may be use in the future.  I noticed that the red bleed a bit in his yellow on the demo, probably what you hitted by touch and go in your experience.

If I understood Dennis well, when you have a dry edge, you can put water at a little distance from that edge and move it slowly toward the edge. Then by 'rubbing gentle' the bruch on the painted edge you can soften it.  I leaned this very recently, so it would be in the magnolia or one class before, in the recommended order.

Again thank you, most appreciated.

I’m not overly fond of WN’s Permanent Masking Medium, myself. It may work out great for someone who uses it in a very loose painting style. As far as using the Masking Fluid I’m a lifter and scrubber anyway, so the hard edges are usually not an issue for me. :)
Title: Re: masking fluid
Post by: Annie. on December 20, 2016, 08:50:52 AM
 O0

BTW. I really like your watercolor paintings for chidren books, and your studio in the your garden is my envy  :blush: